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ACD/Labs Blog

A 1H-13C HSQC is frequently used to assist in assigning a carbon as CH, CH2 or CH3 (additional blog here). The purpose of this puzzle is to examine a non-standard assignment. The 1H-13C HSQC below shows 2 correlations for each carbon at 121 and 134 ppm. Given also the information on the 1H integrals on the F2...

Like any new process, it takes some practice to extract, understand and convert the information presented from a set of experimental NMR datasets into a fragment. The only fragment that can accommodate the set of restrictions from a 1H-13C HSQC and HMBC is 2,3-dimethylbutane-1,1-diyl. The green arrows illustrate the 2-3JCH coupling responses extracted from an...

The goal of this puzzle is to resolve the ambiguity exhibited within a 2D NMR spectrum and thus provide the correct signal correlation. Although this exercise may seem a trivial one, it is important to go over the rationale when correlating one signal to another. For the following 1H-13C HSQC-DEPT NMR spectrum it is important...

The goal of this puzzle is to resolve the ambiguity exhibited within a 2D NMR spectrum and thus provide the correct signal correlation. The following 1H-13C HSQC-DEPT NMR spectrum shows two one-bond correlations linked to the 1H signals 2.75 and 3.50 ppm and two closely spaced 13C signals at 61.5 and 62.2 ppm. Does the...

There are many advantages in working with a 1H-13C HSQC-DEPT spectrum over a 13C DEPT-135 and a 1H-13C HSQC (see Post 1 & Post 2). In most cases, a 1H-13C HSQC-DEPT is more valuable than either one of those experiments. The aliphatic region of a 1H-13C HSQC-DEPT is spectrum below. Two coincidental carbon signals are...

Where a COSY or TOCSY spectrum can be a challenge for a structure with severe spectral overlap, collecting an HSQC-TOCSY spectrum can be a better choice. An HSQC-TOCSY experiment stands for Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence-Total Correlation Spectroscopy and other variants include HMQC-TOCSY, HSQC-COSY, etc. Depending on the mixing time, the hybrid experiment generally offers information...

In the series Distinguishing Impurities, Part 1 pointed to certain signs in which an elucidator can differentiate a signal as pertaining to an impurity and not to the main unknown. Part 1 also made reference to using 2D NMR data as a practical approach to ascertain whether a signal from a 1H NMR was an...

One of the trickiest parts of interpreting a 1H-13C HMBC is deciding whether a 13C resonance is coinciding with another 13C resonance, i.e. overlapping 13C peaks. A past blog, Part 1, describes a specific case where the possibility of two coinciding 13C resonances can be deciphered based on a high carbon correlation count. Herein, we...

A common misinterpretation of 2D NMR data can occur when dealing with weak correlations. Weak correlations are commonly introduced in how the sample is prepared or how the data is collected or processed. Examining the spectrum down to level of the density matrix can ensure all correlations are picked up. The 1H-13C HMQC below shows...

In addition to using chemical shift information to ascertain a carbon’s proton count (i.e. C, CH, CH2 or CH3), 13C NMR experiments can be set up in a variety of ways to assist with this process. The following simulated spectra compare a variety of 13C NMR experiments for aspartame. Please note that there are variations...